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Flaubert, I Love You, But You’re Bringing Me Down

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So aside from the fact that I want to ride Gustave Flaubert’s epic mustache like a cowboy wants to ride a wild stallion, I also really like his book Madame Bovary.

Gustave FlaubertFirst published as a complete novel in 1857, Madame Bovary and her author Monsieur Flaubert there on the left were attacked for obscenity by the public, its trial and subsequent acquittal lent a fair hand in making the novel famous. It is now considered one of the most influencial books ever written and several top 100 lists, and in fact even a few top ten, stick it right up there in the number one or two spot. It most frequently stands beside Anna Karanina.

Madame Bovary is not a love story. It’s a story of realism and while you expect it would be a sweeping tale of romance wrapped up in juicy extra-marital affairs what the novel really represents is a perversion of values and how they will dehumanize those who hold such values. What we really have here is a morality tale, cloaked in the whispers and false promises of sweet nothings and satisfying trysts. And then she dies.

The main character, Emma Bovary idealizes romance and revels in secret letters, flirtations and clandestine affairs, believing them to be the very true nature of love. Then she finds herself horribly in debt, spurned by her former lovers and offering her own body in payment for bills she cannot possibly settle. Desperately Emma takes her own life, swallowing arsenic and dying slowly and painfully, her various life fluids gushing from her as a symbol of all the secrets that she kept from her naive and passionless husband. Then he dies too. It’s all quite tragic.

Flaubert did not sugar-coat or pander in his work, he started the realism movement, and influences how novels are written today. What readers come to expect from today’s authors, is a direct result of his presenting life as it is, without flourished embellishments or foolish idealism. While he presented ugly truths, he painted them beautifully, as an artist. He is precise, objective and emotionally restrained as a writer, yet he was able to take horrible things and describe them in ways that made them less ugly. Flaubert throughout his work also sought “le juste mot” the right word, rather than wrap it up in an approximate or something that didn’t quite fit, he always went for the unadorned, direct and sometimes brutal “juste mot”.

TLDR?

here:

A Poor Player, That Struts and Frets

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The Sound and The Fury.

A few perspectives, brought to you by the awesome power of the internet.